Creative Commons

Sharon: A new one! There’s no example with this one, but maybe we should use example 2 (your original example) from the Photography Toolkit. Martha might have other ideas.

Creative Commons is a complementary alternative to the copyright system established by the Copyright Act. Creative Commons was developed in response to some of the shortcomings of current copyright law in relation to the sharing of creative works. This issue is especially important in an age when creative products can be so easily shared and
manipulated in a digital environment.

Applying a Creative Commons license to your work does not mean you renounce legal right to your work under the copyright law in Canada. It simply lets you tell others how they can use your work.

There are four different Creative Commons licensing conditions:

Attribution: You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your copyrighted work — and derivative works based upon it — but only if they give you credit.

Noncommercial: You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your work — and derivative works based upon it — but for noncommercial purposes only.

No Derivative works: You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform only verbatim copies of your work, not derivative works based upon it.

Share alike: You allow others to distribute derivative works only under a license identical to the license that governs your work.

Based on the conditions you wish to apply to your work, there are six different Creative Commons licenses you can choose from:

  1. Attribution
  2. Attribution–No Derivatives
  3. Attribution–Non-Commercial–No Derivatives
  4. Attribution–Non-Commercial
  5. Attribution–Non-Commercial–Share Alike
  6. Attribution–Share Alike

For more about Creative Commons licenses, visit the Creative Commons Canada website.

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